Special Diabetes Programs

The American Diabetes Association has long been a leader and partner in efforts to increase the federal commitment to cure and prevent diabetes and to address the diabetes epidemic in disproportionately impacted populations. Since 1997, a key component of these efforts has been the Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) at the Indian Health Service (IHS) and the Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1 Diabetes Research (SDP-type1) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). These two programs represent a significant contribution from the federal government to combat, prevent and cure diabetes. Both of these vital programs require periodic Congressional re-authorization.

On March 31, 2014, Congress renewed the Special Diabetes Programs for another year and it is now set to expire in September of 2015. Timely, multi-year renewals allow us to build on the program’s advances in its initial years by accelerating the translation of the discoveries already made into treatments and cures for the benefit of all Americans living with diabetes.

Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1 Diabetes Research (SDP-type 1)

SDP-type 1 is special funding for research on the prevention and cure of type 1 diabetes. It provides researchers the chance they need to carry out long-term research that can have an impact on thousands of lives.

SDP-type 1 has lead to real advances in many areas of type 1 diabetes research. The program has created significant research opportunities that are helping to improve the lives of people living with diabetes, prevent the onset of the disease in others, and bring us closer to a cure for this costly and growing disease.

Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI)

SDPI gives Indian health programs and tribal communities the resources and tools they need to both prevent and treat diabetes. American Indians and Alaska Natives have the highest age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes among all U.S. racial and ethnic groups – nearly 16%!

SDPI funding has led to demonstrated and continued improvements in diabetes prevention and care in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. These improvements ultimately benefit all people with diabetes.

Funding nearly 400 community-directed programs, local tribes and health programs are provided the opportunity to set priorities around prevention and treatment that meet the needs of the community.

These needed programs help translate the science of diabetes into real-world settings by providing improved care for our patients and prevention efforts that are turning the hope of a diabetes-free future into a reality.

Read about the Special Diabetes Program: Stories of Hope and Progress here!

Read more about Special Diabetes Program in an article featured in Diabetes Forecast here!

  • Last Reviewed: October 3, 2013
  • Last Edited: June 25, 2014

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