Por tu familia

Many Latinos feel guilty spending time and money on personal health. They feel selfish putting their own health care ahead of their family's needs.

The opposite should be true.

The American Diabetes Association is here for your family, but we want to bring the message home that you should take care of your diabetes or prevent yourself from developing it, for your family's sake too. Your family needs you to be healthy and feeling your best, so that you can be there for them.

That's why the name for the Association's Latino Initiatives health campaign is Por tu familia — or "for your family" in English.

Urgent Health Problem

Diabetes is an urgent health problem in the Latino community. Their rates of diabetes are almost double those of non-Latino whites.

Getting information to the community about the seriousness of diabetes, its risk factors and those who may be at risk, and ways to help manage the disease is essential.

Materials targeting the Latino community, available in English and Spanish, are an integral part of our outreach efforts to help improve the quality of life for Latinos with diabetes.

From books to brochures, our publications will give you information on topics ranging from cooking with a Latin flair, to being more physically active, to maintaining a healthy weight.

To request your free copy of our Latin Flavor in the Kitchen Recipe Sampler and to receive a free guide on type 2 diabetes (request ADA Channel number 2), call 1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383). Bilingual representatives are available to take your call.

Community-based activities are another important part of Por tu familia. Through fun and informative workshops and activities, community members can learn more about diabetes, the importance of making healthy food choices and being physically active on a regular basis. Learn more… (PDF)

Diabetes Day

Churches, in partnership with the American Diabetes Association, provide an excellent setting for grassroots diabetes awareness programs. They offer strong leadership within the community; they have a genuine concern about the health of their members and can serve as a link between church members and the general community.

The goals of Diabetes Day are to:

  • increase awareness that diabetes is a serious disease;
  • identify risk factors; and
  • inform the parishioners about the resources available through the American Diabetes Association.

To help others stay informed or learn more about diabetes and its complications, download the following brochure available in English and Spanish Por tu Familia (PDF)

Question: What can I do to find out if I am at risk for diabetes?

Answer: Take our risk test. If you think you or a loved one is at risk for developing diabetes, ask to be checked for diabetes during the next visit to your health care provider.

Stay in Touch

This is a culturally specific community session created for people in the Hispanic/Latino community with diabetes, those at risk for developing diabetes, and those wanting to learn more about the link between diabetes and peripheral neuropathy, and how to manage diabetes in an easy way to remember.

Participants will be able to identify three actions that can be taken to maintain good general health and avoid onset of peripheral neuropathy. They will also be given resources to avoid onset of peripheral neuropathy.

With Open Eyes

This is a culturally specific community session created for people in the Hispanic/Latino community with diabetes, those at risk for developing diabetes, and those wanting to learn about the link between diabetes and retinopathy (eye disease), and how to manage their diabetes in an easy way to remember.

Participants will be able to identify the three simple tests for charting awareness and managing diabetes and three actions that can be taken to maintain good general health and good eye health. They will also be given resources to incorporate into their regular routine in an effort to decrease their risk for diabetes and eye problems.

Everybody Dance for Your Health!

This is something the whole family can do - move to the beats of salsa, merengue, tejano, cumbia and other Latin music. The key objective for this activity — exercising can be fun! Messages about diabetes are shared between songs.

Everybody Move for Your Health!

This community-based workshop outlines the importance of regular physical activity, especially for people with diabetes. Participants learn activities that can be readily incorporated into their family lives to increase physical activity.

At the end of the workshop, participants are able to identify benefits of exercise for people with diabetes as well as different forms of exercise. Each participant develops an individual action plan identifying modest changes they will make to increase their activity levels.

Question: What can I do to move more?

Answer: Here are some suggestions. Dance to three (3) of your favorite songs every day. Go for a walk with a friend or family member. Walk around while talking on the phone. Take the stairs instead of the elevator, or take the stairs for part of the way.

Flavor in the Latino Kitchen

Health and Flavor in the Latino Kitchen is a culturally specific community session created for people in the Latino community with diabetes, those at risk for developing diabetes, and those wanting to learn more about healthy eating for themselves and their families.

This informative and highly interactive session will inform participants about ways to prepare foods in a healthier way, to identify correct portion sizes for preparing healthy meals and to make healthier choices when eating outside the home.

With All My Heart

With All My Heart is a culturally specific community session created for people in the Latino community with diabetes, those at risk for developing diabetes, and those wanting to learn more about keeping their heart healthy.

This informative session will teach participants to identify the ABCs of diabetes management and will encourage them to make a commitment to incorporate healthier habits into their daily routines.

  • Last Reviewed: October 11, 2013
  • Last Edited: October 11, 2013