Reasonable Accommodations in the Workplace

As a person with diabetes, you may need some small changes at your workplace so you can continue to succeed at your job.

For example, if you use insulin, you might need to take breaks to check your blood glucose levels.

If you have neuropathy, you might need permission to sit on a chair or stool.

These are called “reasonable accommodations” and they are required by federal anti-discrimination laws.

In plain English, they are changes that help people with disabilities compete for a wide range of jobs, excel in their work, and be treated fairly.

Most people with diabetes only need minor changes that can be provided at little or no cost to their employers.

Your employer may have to change an otherwise valid workplace policy for you. You should not be denied a reasonable accommodation just because it goes against standard policies or because non-disabled employees are not entitled to it.

Contact us to request assistance.

Common Reasonable Accommodations for Individuals with Diabetes
What are reasonable accommodations? What accommodations do people with diabetes need? Find information about your right to workplace accommodations here.

How to Request Reasonable Accommodations
How do I request reasonable accommodations? What are reasonable accommodations? What accommodations do people with diabetes need? Find information about your right to workplace accommodations here.

Further Tools and Resources
Resources to assist you in obtaining reasonable accommodation in the workplace.

  • Last Reviewed: November 4, 2013
  • Last Edited: March 24, 2014

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Diabetes Forecast