State Laws, Regulations and Policies for School Diabetes Care

Ohio

About this information:

This information was prepared by the American Diabetes Association, a national leader in diabetes information and advocacy. It covers this state's rules on diabetes care, and may not include all the important details. We strive to be constantly up to date, but laws can change. It is not a substitute for professional legal advice.

1. Does Ohio allow people who are not health care professionals to administer insulin at school?

Yes. School staff at both public and private schools may be trained by a nurse or licensed health care worker on how to provide diabetes care, including insulin administration: 

(D)(1) […] the department of education shall adopt nationally recognized guidelines, as determined by the department, for the training of school employees in diabetes care for students. […] (2) The guidelines shall address all of the following issues: […] (g) Administering insulin, glucagon, or other medication in accordance with a student's physician's order and recording the results of the administration; (h) Understanding the relationship between the diet recommended in a student's physician's [order and actions that may be taken if the recommended diet is not followed. ORC Section 3313.7112(D).

Note: After April 4th, 2017, an advanced practice registered nurse or a physician assistant may also issue medical orders and give any diabetes care authorizations, in addition to a physician. Ohio General Assembly 131 House Bill 216, Jan. 2017.

2. Does Ohio allow people who are not health care professionals to administer glucagon at school?

Yes. As stated above, unlicensed school staff may have responsibility for “[a]dministering insulin, glucagon, or other medication” under direction from a treating practitioner. ORC Section 3313.7112.

3. Does Ohio allow students to self-manage diabetes care anytime, anywhere? 

Yes. With authorization from a treating practitioner and guardian, a student with diabetes may manage all aspects of diabetes care anytime, anywhere. However, this privilege may be revoked:

(H)(1) [O]n written request of the parent, guardian, or other person having care or charge of a student and authorization by the student's treating physician, a student with diabetes shall be permitted to attend to the care and management of the student's diabetes in accordance with the student's physician's order during regular school hours and school-sponsored activities if the student's treating physician determines that the student is capable of performing diabetes care tasks. The student shall be permitted to perform diabetes care tasks in a classroom, in any area of the school or school grounds, and at any school-related activity […] (2) If the student performs any diabetes care tasks or uses medical equipment for purposes other than the student's own care, the board or governing authority may revoke the student's permission to attend to the care and management of the student's diabetes. ORC Section 3313.7112.

4. Does Ohio allow students to carry diabetes supplies such as needles, insulin, and blood glucose testing devices anytime and anywhere?

Yes. With authorization from a treating practitioner and a guardian, a student may be permitted to “possess on the student's self at all times all necessary supplies and equipment to perform these tasks.” ORC Section 3313.7112 (H). 

5. Can a child with diabetes be transferred to a different school because of need for diabetes care? 

No. Ohio law states that a student with diabetes must be able to attend the school they would normally go to if they did not have diabetes:

(G) A student with diabetes shall be permitted to attend the school the student would otherwise attend if the student did not have diabetes and the diabetes care […] shall be provided at the school. A board or governing authority shall not restrict a student who has diabetes from attending the school on the basis that the student has diabetes, that the school does not have a full-time school nurse, or that the school does not have an employee trained in diabetes care. The school shall not require or pressure a parent, guardian, or other person having care or charge of a student to provide diabetes care for the student with diabetes at school or school-related activities. ORC Section 3313.7112.

Resources: 

For more information, see the following resources:

  • Last Reviewed: October 17, 2013
  • Last Edited: December 17, 2014

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