Darlene Cain Receives American Diabetes Association's Distinguished Service Award

Alexandria,
November 19, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


— Darlene La Rose Cain Presented with Charles H. Best Medal for Distinguished Service —

The American Diabetes Association (ADA), the nation’s leading voluntary health organization in the fight against diabetes, announced today that Darlene La Rose Cain, of Portland, Oregon, received the Association's prestigious Charles H. Best Medal for Distinguished Serviceat the organization’s Community Volunteer Leadership Conference and Annual Meeting on November 17, in St. Louis, Missouri.

The Charles H. Best Medal for Distinguished Service is awarded to the Chair of the Board of the American Diabetes Association upon leaving office. Named for Dr. Best, the co-discoverer of insulin, this award recognizes service on behalf of the Association and Americans with diabetes.

"On behalf of the American Diabetes Association, we are delighted to present this prestigious award to Darlene," commented John Buse, MD, PhD, President, Medicine & Science, American Diabetes Association.  “Her contributions to the diabetes community and dedication to diabetes awareness directly support ADA's mission to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people living with diabetes."

Cain has been a dedicated and passionate advocate of ADA’s mission and an active leader within the Association for 20 years. Having witnessed the battle that follows a diabetes diagnosis time and time again within her extended family, she holds a deep and personal connection to the work of the Association.

Prior to her appointment to Chair of the Board in November 2006, Cain served on numerous national committees, including the Board of Directors, Fund Raising, Programs, Strategic Planning Steering, Marketing & Communications, Community & Volunteer Development, as well as the Committee on Councils and Committees. She has also served as a Vice Chair of ADA’s Research Foundation.

Her local activities include two terms as Chair of the Oregon Affiliate and Chair of the NW Region, covering Washington, Oregon, Alaska, Wyoming, Idaho, and Hawaii. While serving as Chair of the Oregon Affiliate, Cain was awarded the Charles Best Award for Affiliate Service. She currently serves on the founding council of the new Diabetes Institute at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in Portland which is modeled after the Joslin Diabetes Center.

Throughout her tenure, Cain has been a driving force in expanding the Association’s influence and effectiveness in the areas of development and fund raising. In 1989, she founded and directed ADA’s Gala Auction in Portland, Oregon, and has continuously chaired the annual event for the past 17 years. The Gala has consistently been one of ADA’s top single night fund raisers and has raised more than $7 million to date.

Cain regularly shares her expertise in the areas of fund raising, development, and advocacy with ADA communities across the country. Her years of experience with state and local school boards and her tenure with the Oregon Governor’s Task Force have been instrumental in supporting School Tax Bases in successful campaigns and in lobbying the mission of ADA for better nutrition in Oregon schools at the state legislature.

She is also ADA’s National Liaison to the Order of the Amaranth, providing a conduit and raising awareness of this all-volunteer organization that has raised millions in research grants to find a cure for diabetes since 1972. She is a member of ADA’s Pinnacle Society and the Summit Circle, which recognize major donors and planned giving.

In addition, Cain played an active role in ensuring that the United Nations World Diabetes Day Resolution became reality. In addition to various outreach activities, she took part in the 2006 World Diabetes Congress in South Africa which partly focused on the adoption of the Resolution.

Her many distinguished honors include ADA’s National Fund Raiser of the Year Award in 1996 and the Association's Addison B. Scoville Award for Outstanding Volunteer Service in 2000.

Ms. Cain holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Education from Lewis and Clark College in Portland.

Diabetes is a serious disease that affects the body’s ability to produce or respond properly to insulin, a hormone that allows blood sugar to enter the cells of the body and be used for energy.  Nearly 21 million children and adults have diabetes.  At least 54 million have pre-diabetes.  Diabetes is the fifth leading cause of death by disease in the United States and it has no cure.


About the ADA
The American Diabetes Association is the nation’s premier voluntary health organization supporting diabetes research, information and advocacy.  Founded in 1940, the Association has offices in every region of the country, providing services to hundreds of communities.  The Association’s commitment to research is reflected through its scientific meetings; education and provider recognition programs; and its Research Foundation and Nationwide Research Program, which fund breakthrough studies looking into the cure, prevention, and treatment of diabetes and its complications.  For more information, visit diabetes.org or call 800-DIABETES (800-342-2383).


The American Diabetes Association is leading the fight to Stop Diabetes and its deadly consequences and fighting for those affected by diabetes. The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. Founded in 1940, our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.

For more information please call the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383) or visit www.diabetes.org. Information from both these sources is available in English and Spanish.