American Diabetes Association Applauds FDA’s Approval of the First Hybrid Insulin Delivery System

Contact

Michelle Kirkwood
mkirkwood@diabetes.org
703-299-2053

Alexandria, Virginia
September 28, 2016

The American Diabetes Association is pleased with the FDA’s approval today of the first hybrid insulin delivery system. This is a critical step in the development of an artificial pancreas, and an important milestone for people with type 1 diabetes.

The MiniMed 670G is the first pump-sensor system to automatically adjust basal insulin levels, up or down, based on continuous glucose readings from an integrated continuous glucose monitor. Patients will continue to make insulin dosing decisions at mealtime, with the MiniMed 670G providing dose recommendations based on the patient’s blood glucose levels and trends. Patients will also need to perform finger-stick glucose checks for calibration of the device. The system is appropriate for anyone who is currently using or is a good candidate for an insulin pump. The FDA has approved the MiniMed 670G for people age 14 and older.

We are excited for this advancement, and we look forward to the development of the next phase of automated systems that can provide bolus doses of insulin. We envision that these incremental innovations will lead to a fully automated closed-loop system to provide optimal glucose control and independence for people with diabetes.

About the American Diabetes Association

Nearly half of American adults have diabetes or prediabetes; more than 30 million adults and children have diabetes; and every 21 seconds, another individual is diagnosed with diabetes in the U.S. Founded in 1940, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) is the nation’s leading voluntary health organization whose mission is to prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. The ADA drives discovery by funding research to treat, manage and prevent all types of diabetes, as well as to search for cures; raises voice to the urgency of the diabetes epidemic; and works to safeguard policies and programs that protect people with diabetes. In addition, the ADA supports people living with diabetes, those at risk of developing diabetes, and the health care professionals who serve them through information and programs that can improve health outcomes and quality of life. For more information, please call the ADA at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit diabetes.org. Information from both of these sources is available in English and Spanish. Find us on Facebook (American Diabetes Association), Twitter (@AmDiabetesAssn) and Instagram (@AmDiabetesAssn)